New Otomi Tablecloth/Bedspread Embroidered Textiles

Otomi Fabric

New pieces that I just brought back from Mexico! Click on the photo to take you to the online shop. Or contact us here with questions…

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Mexican Table Runners

Mexican Table Runners

Almost every region has a style of textile for which it is known. And almost every region has artisans who weave handmade table runners. This lovely blue and red woven table runner comes from the state of Chiapas, specifically, San Andres de Larrainzar. This, and many others, are woven on a backstrap loom. Super amazing and a lot of work. These women are SO talented.

I like to purchase table runners wherever I go in Mexico because they can be used on the table or for other things (like pillows) or even used to cover lampshades. We have a number of table runners at the moment in the online shop. Click on the photo for the blue and red one, but take a look around for other table runners from Chiapas and other states in Mexico.


Otomi Embroidered Textiles, Handmade in Mexico

Otomi Embroidered Textiles, Handmade in Mexico

This is a beautiful placemat sized Otomi embroidery that I found in Oaxaca. The Otomi Indians live in various places–Hidalgo, Puebla, Oaxaca–and their textiles can be found throughout the country. Just be careful about the quality, they can vary widely depending on the skill of the artisan. Usually Otomi embroideries (which come in several different sizes) are done on an off-white muslin background. These 5 pieces are on a very nice black cotton. Can you imagine it framed or made into a pillow? The colors are as they appear in this photo–vivid!

Click on the photo to take you to the online shop!


Brown Mexican Textiles

Winston Churchill said many things well. And he commented on many things.  But who knew he had an opinion about color? The esteemed Mr. Churchill said, “I cannot pretend to feel impartial about colors. I rejoice with the brilliant ones and am genuinely sorry for the poor browns.”

This post is in honor of the poor browns. They tend to take a back seat to their fellow colors, especially in Mexico. These textiles were discovered at the bottom of the pile, underneath the pinks, roses, reds, yellows, bright oranges and greens. They are a quieter bunch. I do think they have a certain beauty. But they don’t always stand out. They are good listeners. They don’t talk unless they have something to say. They shine when they are on their own. They never compete for attention.

Many of these camino de mesas (table runners) or placemats are woven of a natural brown cotton called “coyuche,” a word that comes from the Nahuatl word for coyote. On the other hand, it is possible that it is white thread dyed to look like coyuche, according to research done by an amazing textile archivist by the name of Karen Elwell. Her many photos of Mexican textiles and clothing are always instructional. Her Flickr photostream is right here.

The  photos below are the textiles I currently have in the shop. CLICK on the photograph to take you to the shop. Some are in the online store, but if not, just send me an email on the form at the bottom and I’ll let you know if it’s available!

Handmade Mexican Textiles

Mexican Textile from Teotitlan de Valle, Oaxaca

Mexican Textile, Table Runner from Chiapas

Handmade Mexican Textiles, Teotitlan

Handmade Mexican Textiles

Handmade Mexican Textiles

Handmade Mexican Textiles, Otomi Textiles

Handmade Mexican Textiles, Guatemalan Textiles

I couldn’t resist with the last photo. Brilliant color with the poor brown.


Mexican Folk Art Placemats for the Thanksgiving Table

A few weeks ago at GUILD  Collective we put together a table that mixed pieces from Mexico with vintage dishes and silverware. It was surprising how beautiful the whole thing looked–a real mezcla/mixture–of old and new, Mexican tapestry placemats, religious icons and traditional china (see first picture) and glassware. If you’re starting to think about your Thanksgiving or holiday table, consider going global and combining the unexpected in a fresh way. If you are in need of some happy color to add to the mix, take a look at these colorful placemats, available online. They come in lots of different colors–each one is unique!

Our new holiday hours at GUILD went into effect this week and we will be open on Sundays, starting November 6 from 12-5.  I’ll be working tomorrow!

NEW GUILD COLLECTIVE SHOP HOURS
Tues-Saturday: 10-6
Sunday: 12-5
Closed Mondays