Sacred Hearts In Mexican Folk Art

Alpaca Sacred Heart, Mexican Folk Art

The Sacred Heart is one of the most common motifs in religious folk art created in Mexico. The idea is that the physical heart of Jesus is a symbol of his divine love for humanity. The Mexican folk art sacred heart comes in various forms–with flames around it, with a crown, with a dagger through the center and sometimes with a crown of thorns–and all represent the same thing, Jesus’ compassion for humanity. In some Christian paintings it is depicted as a flaming heart shining with divine light, pierced by the lance-wound, encircled by the crown of thorns, topped  by a cross and bleeding.  The bleeding and wounds and crown of thorns allude to the manner of Jesus’ death while the fire stands for the transformative power of God’s love.

And of course, you know that almost everyone in Mexico is Catholic so these images are commonly seen throughout the country…

Mexican folk art, Sacred Heart

Here are a few interpretations of the sacred heart by some of Mexico’s folk artists. The two hearts above, hang on the wall. One is shiny nickel silver  (5″ tall) and other is a patina-ed nickel silver or alpaca (7″ tall). They are $38 for the shiny one and $28 for the darker one.

The two sets of earrings below are made of silver and come from Taxco, Mexico. The lovely crowned earrings are $38 and the pendant, $30. The stunning, oxidized earrings with lovebirds and a flaming heart are $78.  Click on the photo of the earring to take you to the online store.

Contact us through the form below if you are interested in purchasing the sacred hearts above or anything else!

To see what else we have for sale in the online shop, click here.

Silver jewelry, Sterling silver earrings from Mexico

Silver jewelry, Sterling silver earrings from Mexico, Sacred Heart


What is the Significance of Hands in Mexican Folk Art?

One of the most frequent questions I’m asked in the shop is, “What is the significance of the hand in Mexico?”

Hand motifs do appear in many pieces of jewelry and religious iconography from Mexico and though there is no absolute answer to the question,  here are a few ideas.

One of the most obvious answers is that the hand is so important to all of us in terms of making things (hand-made), performing, communicating, praying (especially when 90% of the country is Catholic) and in making us human. This is just as true in Mexico as it is in other places.  The heart in the hand (another common image in Mexico) is a traditional folk art motif, associated with the Shakers, the Amish, and the Pennsylvania Dutch.  It is widely considered to symbolize charity, or to mean something is “from the heart”. Others consider it to represent friendship, love and truth.

The hand motif in Mexican jewelry probably increased after Pablo Picasso’s gift of the silver hand-shaped earrings to Frida Kahlo in the 1930’s or 40’s. She painted herself in them and many nicho boxes and retablos created around Frida’s image contain those famous paintings. Some Mexican artisans make beautiful hand-shaped earrings.

Here are a few pieces we currently have in the shop that can give you an idea…

Nickel Silver Frida Kahlo Necklace & Earrings, Zinnia Folk Arts

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Contact us for this lovely wooden hand covered on one side with milagros. It is $58 and measures 7″ by 4.35″ wide.

Guadalupe EArrings, Zinnia Folk Arts

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This beautiful and amazing carved hand is covered on both sides with milagros. It costs $166 and measures 10.5″ tall by 4.5″ wide.

Nickel Silver Frida Kahlo Necklace & Earrings, Zinnia Folk Arts


Write a Winning Limerick Testimonial about Zinnia Folk Arts and Choose a Mexican Folk Art Gift!

Write a Limerick Testimonial about Zinnia Folk Arts and Choose a Gift!

Love to write limericks? Or never done it before but would like to win one of the four amazing pieces of Mexican folk art in the photo?

As you know, our First Birthday is coming up soon and to celebrate we’re offering a choice of one of the four pieces pictured here (all valued between $150-$225) to the winning testimonial limerick. Here are the rules:

1. Write an awesome limerick about Zinnia Folk Arts and what you love about it.
1.1 You may submit as many as you like.
1.2  Relatives and friends may submit anonymously by sending via snail mail to Zinnia, 826 W 50th, Mpls 55491. Put a number on the limerick so it can be identified.
2. Submit it to Anne at info@ZinniaFolkArts.com by Sunday, May 5, 2013 at 4:00 CST either in the shop or online.
3. The winner will be notified on Tuesday, May 7, 2013.
4. All entrants agree to permit Zinnia Folk Arts to use their limerick testimonial in online and shop promotion, with credit.
5. The winner chooses one of the four pieces featured in this photo–large wood tigre mask, large hammered tin mirror, large wood hand covered on both sides with milagros or the large blue (no lead) Metepec platter
6. Winner will pick up the gift in the shop at 826 West 50th St., Minneapolis. If the winner lives outside of Minneapolis, the winner will pay for shipping costs.
7. Questions? Please ask!

Here’s some inspiration!

There was a young belle of old Natchez
Whose garments were always in patchez.
When comments arose
On the state of her clothes,
She replied, “When Ah itchez, Ah scratchez.”
—Ogden Nash

There was a young lady named Bright
Who traveled much faster than light.
She set out one day,
In a relative way,
And came back the previous night.
—Anonymous


The Virgin of Guadalupe and Mexican Folk Art

In Mexico, December 12 is the Fiesta of  la Virgen de Guadalupe. Pilgrims from all over Mexico walk, ride buses, drive, ride bikes and even walk on their knees to arrive at the Basilica of Guadalupe that was built on the hill where Juan Diego saw the Virgin three times in the 1500’s. The tilma that was seen by Juan Diego is preserved in the Basilica and many, many people make pilgrimages to see it and to pray for help of all kinds. But it’s not just in Mexico City that people remember and celebrate her today–it’s everywhere in the country.

Guadalupe is a world-famous icon of the Virgin Mary. She is fondly known as the “Queen of Mexico.” Her image can be found everywhere in Mexico. She’s recognizable by the golden rays that surround her image and by the little cherub at her feet.

Here’s a photo of the original Basilica de Guadalupe in Mexico City.

Mexico City Basilica de Guadalupe

Yes, it’s sinking! That’s partly why a new Basilica was built to the left of this photo. I like the old one better.

Basilica de Virgen de Guadalupe

Light a candle and leave it outside one of several chapels on the Tepeyac Hill.

Lux Mexican Religious Candle

We carry 5″ tall Lux Candles. Take off the tissue paper and the lid, light it and wait for the image to be illuminated by the flame (it will take a while).

Folk artists use her image in every imaginable way and express their love and admiration for her through their media.

Ocumicho Guadalupe Wall Plaque

This is  the Virgen de Guadalupe according to the Purepecha people of Michoacan. The whimsical Guadalupe wall plaque was made in Ocumicho.

Virgen de Guadalupe Wall Hanging Plate

Wooden bateas (carved trays) painted with the Virgin’s image come from Michoacan. These are decorative and are meant to be hung on the wall or set in a holder for display.

Reverse Glass Paintiing of the Virgen de Guadalupe

This is a reverse glass painting of la Virgen. The technique is an old-fashioned one but is being revived by a Mexico City artist, Manuel Bauman.

Wooden Retablo with Guadalupe & Saints, Mexico

This is a large and lovely retablo with many saints on wood and painted in Michoacan. Available in the shop or by email!

Tin Cross with Virgin of Guadalupe

This gorgeous tin cross decorated on the inside with Guadalupe and the symbolic roses comes from Oaxaca. Available in the shop or by email!

Guadalupe Earrings, Nickel Silver

Nickel Silver earrings with the image of the Virgin available here.

Decorative Boxes with Virgin of Guadalupe

And of course decorative boxes! These are especially lovely and very unique. They are from Mexico City. Available in the shop or by email.


Nativity Scenes from Mexico

As I’ve mentioned before, Mexico is predominantly a Catholic country (over 90%). So, much of the handmade folk art from every region is related to either the Virgin of Guadalupe, believing in miracles, wishing and hoping for protection from the bad, thanking God for the good, remembering the dead or expressing one’s faith. As we get closer to Christmas, the Christmas markets will start popping up allowing one to buy all kinds of decorations and food related to Christmas.

People buy complete nativity scenes in Mexico but there is also a tradition that happens in other parts of the world–buying the nativity scene one piece at a time. If you go to the Christmas markets you’ll see Baby Jesus in all kinds of sizes and colors as well as the lambs, cows, mangers and other nativity figures. You can purchase one or all or simply add on to your nativity scene every year. Jesus is also purchased separately because he doesn’t appear in the scene until December 24th…the Three Kings are added to the nativity on January 6th.

Mexican folk art Nativity

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Josefina Aguilar Nativity, Oaxaca, Mexico

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Peruvian Nativity in Flower

Oaxacan Carved Wood Nativity Set, Oaxaca Mexico

Metepec Nativity Tree of LIfe, Mexican folk art

As always, if you have questions or would like to purchase any of these Mexican nacimientos, just let me know!


Our Shop is Open!

Gallery Shop of Mexican Folk ArtMinneapolis folk art shop

Mexican folk art

Folk art shop in Minneapolis

Paper Mache Day of the Dead Folk Art

Minneapolis Folk Arts shop

Zinnia Folk Arts opening weekend

Flores of paper, pinatas

Smiling Charro folk art

zinnia Folk Arts opening weekend

Mexican Chevron urns with lids

Come visit us and put a smile on your face…Celebrate the joy of the great country of Mexico… See the ART in folk art!

We’re open Tuesday-Friday 11-6, Saturdays 10-5

Closed on Sunday & Monday

612-824-4342
www.ZinniaFolkArts.com


Red Package Amulets or “Protecciones” from Mexico

 

Mexican Protections from evil, red package amulet

Shiny red and gold packages, wrapped in cellophane, containing a horseshoe wrapped in colorful rayon thread and decorated with sequins, plant materials, symbolic objects, glitter and always a small print of a saint (usually San Martin Caballero) are one of the many religious folk art charms that keep many Mexicans safe. They are designed to attract good luck and keep evil at bay and are hung over the door, in the glove compartment of the car, placed on a shrine or wherever one might need a little luck. On the back of most of them is a photocopied prayer or incantation called, “El Secreto de la Virtuoso Herradura.”

Stop in to the new shop after May 18th to see our current selection of large to small protecciones and add a little more “protection” to your life!