Capelo Mexican Handmade Ceramics

If you like Mexican ceramics, you may be familiar with the majolica of  “Capelo” from Guanajuato, Mexico. The pieces are made in the traditional way, on a wheel, fired several times at a very high temperature and in Capelo’s case, glazed with the most beautiful, subtle colors. We currently have  a number of Capelo vases in the shop. Here are a few shots…

Capelo Mexican Ceramics

Capelo Mexican Vase

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Mexican Ceramics, Capelo

Mexican Ceramics, Capelo

If you’re interested in any of these or would like to see more photos and get prices, contact us via the form below! Gracias…

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Ceramics from Capula, Michoacan

Ceramics from Capula, Michoacan

Some of you know that Capula, Michoacan is famous for its artisans who make gorgeous Day of the Dead catrinas. But did you know that there are other ceramics for which they are equally well known? Here is an example of a very unusual piece from Capula. It’s unusual because of the color combination–usually they are terracotta background with black fish and other designs. This one is orange, blue, cream and yellow! Super beautiful and unique. The painting in the pointillism style is superb. Click on the photo to take you to the online shop.


Zinnia Folk Arts on Tumblr

Have you followed Zinnia Folk Arts on Tumblr? We actively post photographs of folk art and the great country of Mexico there almost every day…so if like the visual side of this blog or enjoy the color and vitality of Mexico, please follow us there! It’s much faster for me to post there too, now that the brick and mortar shop is getting busy for the holidays.  Take a look!

Zinnia Folk Arts on Tumblr


Hunting for Quality Folk Art in Mexico

You may know that I recently returned (last Monday) from a 12 day trip to Mexico. Everyone asks me if I had fun on the trip and I always have to pause just a moment before I say, “Yes, it was fun.” Because it is fun but it is also exhausting, exciting, difficult, frustrating, not relaxing, amazing, delicious, sometimes confusing and did I mention, exhausting? So many people associate Mexico with vacation, that I think it’s hard for people to imagine that I’m not sitting on the beach with a salty Margarita with Fernando!

I travel to Mexico several times a year to purchase folk art for the shop and I try to go somewhere new every time I go and I try to find new artisans every time I go. It’s the new adventures that are the most exhausting. The artisans I’ve visited before, I now  know where to find, I’ve figured out the logistics of how to get there, how to pack everything, how to schlep it to the shipper, how to get everything back safely without too much breakage or loss.

But, the new artisans are sometimes much more difficult to find, requiring stopping in corner grocery stores and asking addresses, stopping people on the street and asking if they know so-and-so, driving down narrow cobblestone streets, driving down one-lane streets then having to back out, asking people again where the person lives and then getting answers like, “Oh, he lives in the house with the wood door.”  Many of the addresses are something like, Mr. ABC, Calle XYZ, Sin Numero or XYZ Street, Without a Number. It’s not easy, amigos!

But also how rewarding! Many of the artisans I have visited are in very out-of-the-way houses in very out-of-the-way pueblos. The pleasure they have when I arrive (and the amazing warmth and generosity) and the pride of workmanship and of course, the excitement of being able to sell something lovely, more than compensates for the difficulty. And then of course the pleasure that these fine works of folk art give to my customers in the US,  is also a great pleasure.

Mexican folk art, Mexican ceramics,

This is a little family  that I found after asking 8 people in two towns and 5 different streets. It took an afternoon but as you can see, TOTALLY worth it.

How about you?  Have you had any adventures searching for artisans in Mexico?


Our First Birthday at 50th & Bryant Coming Soon!

Our First Birthday at 50th & Bryant Coming Soon!

If you’re in the Twin Cities, be sure to save the date and join us on May 4 or 5 to celebrate our first birthday AND Cinco de Mayo…fun, food and folk art…Nos vemos!


Zinnia Mexican Folk Arts Shop

I thought you might be interested in the most recent look at  how we like to display Mexican folk art at Zinnia Folk Arts shop! We wanted to move the holiday decorations out so I decided to put the vintage (1960’s White Period) Heron Martinez tree of life in the front window and build a colorful support cast of a variety of Mexican crafts. The color is so welcome during these grey days in Minnesota…it’s actually raining today. Enjoy the photos and of course, if you’re in Minneapolis, stop in. We’ll be waiting for you. Saludos!

Zinnia Folk Arts Shop, Minneapolis MN

Zinnia Mexican Folk Arts, Minneapolis MN

Zinnia Folk Arts, Minneapolis, MN

Zinnia Folk Arts Shop, Minneapolis MN

Zinnia Mexican Folk Arts Shop, Minneapolis MN


Mexican Folk Art Plates from Delores Hidalgo, Mexico

Mexican ceramics from Delores HidalgoMexican ceramics from Delores HidalgoMexican ceramics from Delores HidalgoMexican Ceramics from Delores Hidalgo
Summer is winding down in Minnesota,  but if you aren’t quite ready to let it go (or you live in a warm weather climate all year-long–lucky you) take a look at this handmade Mexican folk art from the town of Delores Hidalgo. These cheerful Mexican crafts are made individually the old-fashioned way. Yes, on a wheel and then glazed and fired. They are safe for eating (no lead) and can go into the microwave and dishwasher. These somewhat low fired ceramics can chip so it’s a good idea to treat them with respect. (No juggling.)

Almost every region of Mexico makes objects out of clay. In the state of Guanajuato, Delores Hidalgo is known for making “talavera.” There are hundreds of shops selling a wide range of ceramics in varying levels of quality. Talavera is a style of ceramic work that was brought to Mexico by the Spaniards after the conquest in the 1500’s. The other city that is perhaps even more well-known for talavera and is home to many masters of the craft, is Puebla in the state of Puebla. Puebla is home to one of the best, Uriarte. The styles of the talavera in the two cities are somewhat different with Puebla being even more Spanish in tradition. Another offshoot of these functional Mexican crafts is “majolica” and that can be found principally in the city of Guanajuato. Gorky Gonzalez is one of the famous potters of Guanajuato and many people recognize the Gorky style immediately. Another well-known majolica artisan in the city of Guanajuato is Capelo.

The functional Mexican folk art ceramics of Mexico are beautiful and we carry a lot of them in the shop at Zinnia Folk Arts. Stop in to our Twin Cities store or take a look right here!